1:01 am - Sun, Apr 13, 2014
130,834 notes

taggedrne:

when ur mom forgets she gave u money already and gives u more

image

(via rolypolypunk)

12:53 am
655 notes
Are you calling me a liar?

Used by black parents when a black child tries to defend himself or herself against an allegation. 

African-American Proverb: Black Parent Edition 

(via blackproverbs)

12:28 am
47,479 notes

ffffjjjj:

I love Wayne Brady lmao

(Source: bloodyoathmate)

12:18 am - Mon, Mar 3, 2014
80,025 notes
soeunintheuniverse:

chrisnolansscarf:

what a time to be alive.

this may be my new favourite thing on the planet

soeunintheuniverse:

chrisnolansscarf:

what a time to be alive.

this may be my new favourite thing on the planet

(via nadiaaboulhosn)

10:00 pm - Fri, Feb 28, 2014

Oscar nominated films I’ve seen so far..

…I did not do so well this year.

American Hustle

12 Years A Slave

Her

Gravity

The Great Gatsby

August: Osage County

9:47 pm - Mon, Feb 17, 2014
207,822 notes

(via ffffjjjj)

9:46 pm
103,322 notes
so poignant

so poignant

(Source: jstewarts, via hellogiggles)

8:21 pm - Fri, Feb 14, 2014
27,463 notes
thatawkwardmomentmovie:

Mikey doesn’t know how to be single…

thatawkwardmomentmovie:

Mikey doesn’t know how to be single…

5:53 pm - Tue, Feb 4, 2014
79,976 notes
ffffjjjj:

Serfbort

ffffjjjj:

Serfbort

(Source: tatecollectives)

7:43 pm - Mon, Jan 20, 2014
3,845 notes
thepeoplesrecord:

Franklin McCain, one of the “Greensboro Four” who in 1960 sat down at a whites-only lunch counter in North Carolina and launched a sit-in movement that would soon spread to cities across the nation, has died.
McCain died Thursday “after a brief illness at Moses Cone Hospital in Greensboro.”
McCain once told NPR, as WUNC says, about how he overcame any fear about being arrested — or having something worse happen:


"I certainly wasn’t afraid. And I wasn’t afraid because I was too angry to be afraid. If I were lucky I would be carted off to jail for a long, long time. And if I were not so lucky, then I would be going back to my campus, in a pine box."


In it remembrance of McCain, the station adds this account of the historic day in 1960:


"McCain and his classmates walked into the store, purchased some items and then walked over to the segregated counter. McCain recalls:
" ‘Fifteen seconds after I sat on that stool, I had the most wonderful feeling. I had a feeling of liberation, restored manhood; I had a natural high. And I truly felt almost invincible.’
"He hadn’t even asked for service. When McCain and the others did, they were denied. A manager told them they weren’t welcome, a police officer patted his hand with his night stick. The tension grew but it never turned violent.
"As McCain and the others continued to sit at the counter, an older white woman who had been observing the scene walked up behind him:
" ‘And she whispered in a calm voice,boys, I’m so proud of you.’
"McCain says he was stunned:
" ‘What I learned from that little incident was don’t you ever, ever stereotype anybody in this life until you at least experience them and have the opportunity to talk to them."
"Woolworth’s closed early and the four men returned to campus with empty stomachs and no idea about what they had just started. The next day another 20 students joined them and 300 came out by the end of the week. Word of the sit-ins spread by newspapers and demonstrations began in Winston-Salem, Durham, Asheville and Wilmington; within 2 months of the initial sit-in, 54 cities in nine different states had movements of their own.
"The Greensboro lunch counter desegregated six months later."



Source

thepeoplesrecord:

Franklin McCain, one of the “Greensboro Four” who in 1960 sat down at a whites-only lunch counter in North Carolina and launched a sit-in movement that would soon spread to cities across the nation, has died.

McCain died Thursday “after a brief illness at Moses Cone Hospital in Greensboro.”

McCain once told NPR, as WUNC says, about how he overcame any fear about being arrested — or having something worse happen:

"I certainly wasn’t afraid. And I wasn’t afraid because I was too angry to be afraid. If I were lucky I would be carted off to jail for a long, long time. And if I were not so lucky, then I would be going back to my campus, in a pine box."

In it remembrance of McCain, the station adds this account of the historic day in 1960:

"McCain and his classmates walked into the store, purchased some items and then walked over to the segregated counter. McCain recalls:

" ‘Fifteen seconds after I sat on that stool, I had the most wonderful feeling. I had a feeling of liberation, restored manhood; I had a natural high. And I truly felt almost invincible.’

"He hadn’t even asked for service. When McCain and the others did, they were denied. A manager told them they weren’t welcome, a police officer patted his hand with his night stick. The tension grew but it never turned violent.

"As McCain and the others continued to sit at the counter, an older white woman who had been observing the scene walked up behind him:

" ‘And she whispered in a calm voice,boys, I’m so proud of you.’

"McCain says he was stunned:

" ‘What I learned from that little incident was don’t you ever, ever stereotype anybody in this life until you at least experience them and have the opportunity to talk to them."

"Woolworth’s closed early and the four men returned to campus with empty stomachs and no idea about what they had just started. The next day another 20 students joined them and 300 came out by the end of the week. Word of the sit-ins spread by newspapers and demonstrations began in Winston-Salem, Durham, Asheville and Wilmington; within 2 months of the initial sit-in, 54 cities in nine different states had movements of their own.

"The Greensboro lunch counter desegregated six months later."

(via vintagegal)

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